The Asianman

shtml:

70sscifiart:

In the 1970′s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.”

From The Public Domain Review, via Boing Boing

Did anybody notice how similar this looks to the space station from the movie Elysium. 

I’ve got a feeling they did that on purpose.

un-requitedl0ve:

i took you for granted, VHS. i took you for granted..

Good Guy VHS

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

scionoffenrir:

naturepunk:

vantid:

carnivaldog:

shipcomingthrough:

Just watch it.

THIS IS IMPORTANT

It breaks my heart that the indiegogo campaign isn’t even halfway funded. I’m totally chipping in!!

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-roadways

THIS IS GENIUS. 

This might just keep us from complete ruin.

This doesn’t seem very feasible (say, what happens when [not if] someone hacks the lane-marker program?), bit it’s a novel idea and a well-made video

(Source: creeping-in-the-dark)

theonion:

New App Matches You With Others In Vicinity Who Wasted $2.99 On Same App
owlgoggles20:

astutes:

A clock that writes the time.

This is so unnecessary I’ll take 20

I could not own this; it makes 6s the wrong way

owlgoggles20:

astutes:

A clock that writes the time.

This is so unnecessary I’ll take 20

I could not own this; it makes 6s the wrong way

(Source: astutes)

the-forward-observer:

3d printing can be used to print sonograms i.e. life size developing babies. These 3D sonograms are used to help blind expectant parents “see” their babies.

the-forward-observer:

3d printing can be used to print sonograms i.e. life size developing babies. These 3D sonograms are used to help blind expectant parents “see” their babies.

wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.
Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.
Oh, and the men work for Google.
[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

They WOULD be named MacKenzie

wired:

Not much happens in Geraldine, a small farming community in the interior of the South Island of New Zealand, about 85 miles from Christchurch. So when Hayden MacKenzie, a fourth-generation farmer there, picked up the phone last Tuesday and got a request to participate in a secret project—one that he wouldn’t even learn about until he signed a vow of silence—he and his wife Anna figured that they’d take a shot. That evening, two men showed up at his cozy farmhouse. They bore a peculiar red device, a sphere slightly bigger than a volleyball perched on a short collar, and attached it to his roof. Then they left.

Only when the men returned the next day did they reveal what they were up to. Inside the red ball was an antenna that would give the MacKenzies Internet access. It was custom-designed to communicate with a similar antenna that would be floating by in the stratosphere, over 60,000 feet above sea level. On a solar-powered balloon.

Oh, and the men work for Google.

[MORE - EXCLUSIVE: How Google Will Use High-Flying Balloons to Deliver Internet to the Hinterlands]

They WOULD be named MacKenzie

(Source: Wired)

discoverynews:

teamepiphany:

Virtual supermarkets are popping up in subway stations in South Korea, where commuters can virtually shop for items while waiting for the train to come. Customers simply scan an item’s QR code using the free “Homeplus” app and can have it delivered to their doorstep before they even get home. Ranked as the 2nd most hard-working country in the world to Japan, South Korea is rewarding its workers with this timesaving gem.

Wow! I kinda love this idea.

ippinka:

LifeStraw purifies water instantly and inexpensively: it is a solution that can provide millions of under-privileged people with safe drinking water.

Only $20… damn.  We need to find out how to sponsor sending these all over

First Tests For Fusion-Powered Spaceship Propulsion Successful

fuckyeahnerdpr0n:

First Tests For Fusion-Powered Spaceship Propulsion Successful : Space : Science World Report

University of Washington researchers and scientists at a Redmond-based space-propulsion company are currently building components of a fusion-powered rocket, which could enable astronauts to travel to Earth’s neighboring planet Mars within weeks instead of months, at speeds considerably faster than feasible until now. The current travel speeds using fuel rockets make Mars travel a journey of about four years but the new fusion technology being tested by researchers at the University of Washington promises that in 30 to 90 days.

The lab tests have proven to be successful on each part of the process and the scientists are now planning to combine the sections into a one final and overall test.

“Using existing rocket fuels, it’s nearly impossible for humans to explore much beyond Earth,” said lead researcher John Slough, a UW research associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics. “We are hoping to give us a much more powerful source of energy in space that could eventually lead to making interplanetary travel commonplace.”

The team has developed a technology using a special type of plasma that will be encased in a magnetic field. When the plasma is compressed with high pressure by the magnetic field, nuclear fusion takes place.

The process has successfully been tested by researchers and they plan on having the first full test to be done by the end of this summer.

fusion driven rocket test chamber at the UW Plasma Dynamics Lab in Redmond. The green vacuum chamber is surrounded by two large, high-strength aluminum magnets
(Photo : University of Washington)
The fusion driven rocket test chamber at the UW Plasma Dynamics Lab in Redmond. The green vacuum chamber is surrounded by two large, high-strength aluminum magnets. These magnets are powered by energy-storage capacitors through the many cables connected to them.

In practice the powerful magnetic field causes large metal rings surrounding the plasma to implode which will compress it to the point of fusion. The process takes only a few microseconds but that will be enough to release heat and ionize the rings that form a shell around the plasma. The super-heated ionized metal, in turn, ejects out from the rocket at a high velocity pushing the rocket forward. Repeating the process in intervals of about 30 seconds or more can propel a spaceship.

The research was funded by NASA in hopes that the technology would ultimately replace rocket fuel and yield to much faster spacecrafts that ever built before. Scientist say that just a grain size of the material from the plasma used can equal to a gallon of rocket fuel. That by itself will reduce the size of the spacecraft and the payload considerably making deep space travel much more cost effective.

It would be nice to see someone go to Mars in my lifetime. 

So if your phone doesn’t move from a single location between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. for say a week or so, Facebook can quickly deduce the location of your home. Facebook will be able to pinpoint on a map where your home is, whether you share your personal address with the site or not. It can start to build a bigger and better profile of you on its servers. It can start to correlate all of your relationships, all of the places you shop, all of the restaurants you dine in and other such data. The data from accelerometer inside your phone could tell it if you are walking, running or driving. As Zuckerberg said — unlike the iPhone and iOS, Android allows Facebook to do whatever it wants on the platform, and that means accessing the hardware as well.

This future is going to happen – and it is too late to debate. However, the problem is that Facebook is going to use all this data — not to improve our lives — but to target better marketing and advertising messages at us. Zuckerberg made no bones about the fact that Facebook will be pushing ads on Home.

From “Why Facebook Home bothers me: It destroys any notion of privacy.” Spotted by ayjay who adds, “But that particular future isn’t going to happen to those of us who don’t have Facebook accounts.” (via frailestthing)

or smart phones

(Source: borgcomplex)

marketingland:

The Death Of The QR Code

Damn it, and I still don’t own a smart phone. 

marketingland:

The Death Of The QR Code

Damn it, and I still don’t own a smart phone. 

agenerousdesigner:

Smartphone Etiquette by Ted Slampyak

Thank you

(Source: nevver)

lolfactory:

The Times They are A-Changing

and that sweater was ugly in both time periods

lolfactory:

The Times They are A-Changing

and that sweater was ugly in both time periods

Cardboard bicycle can change the world, says Israeli inventor
"I was always fascinated by applying unconventional technologies to materials and I did this on several occasions. But this was the culmination of a few things that came together. I worked for four years to cancel out the corrugated cardboard’s weak structural points," Gafni said.
"Once the shape has been formed and cut, the cardboard is treated with a secret concoction made of organic materials to give it its waterproof and fireproof qualities. In the final stage, it is coated with lacquer paint for appearance. In testing the durability of the treated cardboard, Gafni said he immersed a cross-section in a water tank for several months and it retained all its hardened characteristics.
"Gafni owns several top-of-the-range bicycles which he said are worth thousands of dollars each, but when his own creation reaches mass production, it should cost no more than about $20 to buy. The cost of materials used are estimated at $9 per unit."

Cardboard bicycle can change the world, says Israeli inventor

"I was always fascinated by applying unconventional technologies to materials and I did this on several occasions. But this was the culmination of a few things that came together. I worked for four years to cancel out the corrugated cardboard’s weak structural points," Gafni said.

"Once the shape has been formed and cut, the cardboard is treated with a secret concoction made of organic materials to give it its waterproof and fireproof qualities. In the final stage, it is coated with lacquer paint for appearance. In testing the durability of the treated cardboard, Gafni said he immersed a cross-section in a water tank for several months and it retained all its hardened characteristics.

"Gafni owns several top-of-the-range bicycles which he said are worth thousands of dollars each, but when his own creation reaches mass production, it should cost no more than about $20 to buy. The cost of materials used are estimated at $9 per unit."