The Asianman

policymic:

Incredible color images show Imperial Russia in the 1910s

Color photography as we know it was not possible in 20th century Russia. Instead, Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky created a remarkable process to capture his subjects in this way. He took three separate images — one with a red filter, one with a green filter and one with a blue filter. He later projected these filters onto a screen, superimposing the images to create the images we now have at our fingertips.

Nicholas II took a liking to his photography, and he supported Prokudin-Gorsky’s documentation of all corners of his empire. After the 1917 Russian Revolution that toppled the Tsar government and created the Bolshevik government, the photographer went into exile. The only thing he took with him was his collection of roughly 2,000 glass-plate negatives and a photograph album. The U.S. Library of Congress purchased his photos in 1948 and them in 1980.

Read moreFollow policymic

dichotomization:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” however, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

This was in 1967?  Yikes

dichotomization:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to enter and complete the Boston Marathon as a numbered entry. She registered under the gender-neutral name of “K.V. Switzer”. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” however, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire Marathon. These photographs taken of the incident made world headlines.

This was in 1967?  Yikes

medievalpoc:

It was very fashionable in a lot of 17th and 18th century paintings to have a Black servant featured in portraits of very important historical figures from European History.

Your Professor’s PowerPoint for “George Washington”:

image

image

The actual paintings:

image

image

Your professor’s Powerpoint on Jean Chardin:

image

The actual painting:

image

PowerPoint on Maria Henriette Stuart (with some commentary about the Habsburg jaw):

image

Actual Painting:

image

But, because of whitewashed history curricula, teachers and professors continue to use the cropped images because they don’t want their lecture to get “derailed” by a discussion about race.

These images are also more commonly seen on stock photo sites, including ones for academic use.

I honestly can’t find anyone really writing about this, or even any analysis on how often the cropped photos are used.

The reason they are so easy to crop out is because of the the artistic conventions which reflect the power hierarchy:

Oil paintings of aristocratic families from this period make the point clearly. Artists routinely positioned black people on the edges or at the rear of their canvasses, from where they gaze wonderingly at their masters and mistresses. In order to reveal a ‘hierarchy of power relationships’, they were often placed next to dogs and other domestic animals, with whom they shared, according to the art critic and novelist David Dabydeen, ‘more or less the same status’. Their humanity effaced, they exist in these pictures as solitary mutes, aesthetic foils to their owners’ economic fortunes.

This is drastically oversimplified, but at least it addresses it directly.

If anyone knows more on any studies or statistical evidence on this tendency, feel free to add it.

sds:

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart
Awesome.

We just got a chart like this for the baby’s room!

sds:

The Entire History of the World—Really, All of It—Distilled Into a Single Gorgeous Chart

Awesome.

We just got a chart like this for the baby’s room!

swallowedwholeinnegatives:

What does this mean?

ALIENS
…or…
all humanity descended and spread out from a common ancestor civilization
duh

swallowedwholeinnegatives:

What does this mean?

ALIENS

…or…

all humanity descended and spread out from a common ancestor civilization

duh

(Source: zowieee)

bygoneamericana:

Japanese Americans removed from their Los Angeles homes attend a dance at the government’s camp at Manzanar, California on March 23, 1942.


"We Americans are so great, letting our illegal detainees have dances and such"

bygoneamericana:

Japanese Americans removed from their Los Angeles homes attend a dance at the government’s camp at Manzanar, California on March 23, 1942.

"We Americans are so great, letting our illegal detainees have dances and such"

(Source: wodumedia.com)

htmlwings:

ikenbot:

This Day in Astronomy History: Feb. 13, 1633: Church vs. Galileo

Galileo Galilei, who has run afoul of the church for his theories concerning heliocentrism and for insulting his old friend Pope Urban VIII, arrives in Rome to face an ecclesiastical court on charges of committing heresy.
Galileo’s long-running feud with the Roman Catholic Church over whether the Earth revolved around the sun (the Copernican view advocated by Galileo) or the sun around the Earth (the Aristotelian view echoed in the scriptures) seemed amicably resolved by 1632. But that was before the publication of Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, a book that the pope had allowed to be published as long as his own views on the subject were included.
Galileo included them, but inexplicably (for no malicious intent on the part of Galileo has ever been proven) put Urban’s words into the mouth of his character Simplicius, a defender of Aristotelian geocentrism who was often proved wrong and considered something of a fool. This didn’t go down too well in Rome and Galileo was summoned to face the Inquisition.
He was found guilty and the sentence was severe: He was forced to renounce heliocentrism, Dialogue was banned and Galileo spent the remainder of his life under house arrest. In this last he was lucky: The original sentence called for imprisonment.


Interesting fact about Galileo and heliocentricism: there’s an ongoing historiographical debate regarding whether the Inquisition’s arguably strong reaction to his work was caused primarily by post-Reformation tension within the Church, or by Galileo’s abrasive (to say the LEAST) personality. Most of us, I think, are taught the former in school, but even cursory research will show you that Galileo’s ongoing impudence probably had more to do with it than we might like to think.

Yeah, I’ve been learning this, too.  From what I’ve read, the church was willing to change their minds about heliocentrism if Galileo had mathematical proof, which he did not (yet).  But Galileo was apparently quite an ass to the pope. 

htmlwings:

ikenbot:

This Day in Astronomy History: Feb. 13, 1633: Church vs. Galileo

Galileo Galilei, who has run afoul of the church for his theories concerning heliocentrism and for insulting his old friend Pope Urban VIII, arrives in Rome to face an ecclesiastical court on charges of committing heresy.

Galileo’s long-running feud with the Roman Catholic Church over whether the Earth revolved around the sun (the Copernican view advocated by Galileo) or the sun around the Earth (the Aristotelian view echoed in the scriptures) seemed amicably resolved by 1632. But that was before the publication of Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, a book that the pope had allowed to be published as long as his own views on the subject were included.

Galileo included them, but inexplicably (for no malicious intent on the part of Galileo has ever been proven) put Urban’s words into the mouth of his character Simplicius, a defender of Aristotelian geocentrism who was often proved wrong and considered something of a fool. This didn’t go down too well in Rome and Galileo was summoned to face the Inquisition.

He was found guilty and the sentence was severe: He was forced to renounce heliocentrism, Dialogue was banned and Galileo spent the remainder of his life under house arrest. In this last he was lucky: The original sentence called for imprisonment.

Interesting fact about Galileo and heliocentricism: there’s an ongoing historiographical debate regarding whether the Inquisition’s arguably strong reaction to his work was caused primarily by post-Reformation tension within the Church, or by Galileo’s abrasive (to say the LEAST) personality. Most of us, I think, are taught the former in school, but even cursory research will show you that Galileo’s ongoing impudence probably had more to do with it than we might like to think.

Yeah, I’ve been learning this, too.  From what I’ve read, the church was willing to change their minds about heliocentrism if Galileo had mathematical proof, which he did not (yet).  But Galileo was apparently quite an ass to the pope. 

lastreetsblog:

Via Copenhagenize

very true
cognitivedissonance:

ncpolitics:



Feminist snark, 1915 style


I support snarkiness from all periods of time

I second that.

cognitivedissonance:

ncpolitics:

Feminist snark, 1915 style

I support snarkiness from all periods of time

I second that.

(Source: anarchistsoup)

picturesofwar:

This day in history:

Minutes before giving a speech on a campaign stop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Theodore Roosevelt is shot in an assassination attempt.  

The would-be assassin’s bullet is slowed down after travelling through a steel eyeglass case and the folded, fifty page speech he intended to give, stopping in his chest.  Realizing that he wasn’t coughing up blood, Roosevelt figured he was well enough to go ahead and deliver his speech rather than rush to the hospital.

He spoke for the next 90 minutes, opening with the words:

Ladies and gentlemen, I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose.”

Doctors deemed it too risky to remove the bullet, and Roosevelt carried it with him inside his body for the rest of his life.

October 14, 1912 - 100 years ago today

ancientpeoples:

7 Wonders of the Ancient World: The Hanging Gardens of Babylon
The Hanging Gardens of Babylon are considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. They were purportedly built in the ancient city-state of Babylon, near present-day Al Hillah, Babil province, in Iraq. The Hanging Gardens were not the only World Wonder in Babylon; the city walls and obelisk attributed to Queen Semiramis were also featured in ancient lists of Wonders (though not the list of 7 Ancient ones).
The gardens were attributed to the Neo-Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II, who ruled between 605 and 562 BC. He is reported to have constructed the gardens to please his homesick wife, Amytis of Media, who longed for the plants of her homeland. The gardens were said to have been destroyed by several earthquakes after the 2nd century BC.
Ancient Greek historians, Strabo and Philo, gave us these descriptions of the hanging gardens of Babylon:
Strabo:

“The Garden is quadrangular, and each side is four plethra long. It consists of arched vaults which are located on chequered cube-like foundations.. The ascent of the uppermost terrace-roofs is made by a stairway…”

Philo:

“The Hanging Garden has plants cultivated above ground level, and the roots of the trees are embedded in an upper terrace rather than in the earth. The whole mass is supported on stone columns… Streams of water emerging from elevated sources flow down sloping channels… These waters irrigate the whole garden saturating the roots of plants and keeping the whole area moist. Hence the grass is permanently green and the leaves of trees grow firmly attached to supple branches… This is a work of art of royal luxury and its most striking feature is that the labor of cultivation is suspended above the heads of the spectators.”

However, no cuneiform texts describing the Hanging Gardens have ever been found. 
Ancient writers describe the possible use of something similar to an Archimedes screw as a process of irrigating the terraced gardens. Estimates based on descriptions of the gardens in ancient sources say the Hanging Gardens would have required a minimum amount of 8,200 gallons (37,000 liters) of water per day. Nebuchadnezzar II is also reported to have used massive slabs of stone, a technique not otherwise attested in Babylon, to prevent the water from eroding the ground.
There is some controversy as to whether the Hanging Gardens were an actual construction or a poetic creation, owing to the lack of documentation in contemporaneous Babylonian sources. There is also no mention of Nebuchadnezzar’s wife Amyitis (or any other wives), although a political marriage to a Median or Persian would not have been unusual. Herodotus, writing about Babylon closest in time to Nebuchadnezzar II, does not mention the Hanging Gardens in his Histories. However, it is possible that cuneiform texts on the Hanging Gardens may yet be found.

This is relevant to my interests

ancientpeoples:

7 Wonders of the Ancient World: The Hanging Gardens of Babylon

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon are considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. They were purportedly built in the ancient city-state of Babylon, near present-day Al HillahBabil province, in Iraq. The Hanging Gardens were not the only World Wonder in Babylon; the city walls and obelisk attributed to Queen Semiramis were also featured in ancient lists of Wonders (though not the list of 7 Ancient ones).

The gardens were attributed to the Neo-Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II, who ruled between 605 and 562 BC. He is reported to have constructed the gardens to please his homesick wife, Amytis of Media, who longed for the plants of her homeland. The gardens were said to have been destroyed by several earthquakes after the 2nd century BC.

Ancient Greek historians, Strabo and Philo, gave us these descriptions of the hanging gardens of Babylon:

Strabo:

“The Garden is quadrangular, and each side is four plethra long. It consists of arched vaults which are located on chequered cube-like foundations.. The ascent of the uppermost terrace-roofs is made by a stairway…”

Philo:

“The Hanging Garden has plants cultivated above ground level, and the roots of the trees are embedded in an upper terrace rather than in the earth. The whole mass is supported on stone columns… Streams of water emerging from elevated sources flow down sloping channels… These waters irrigate the whole garden saturating the roots of plants and keeping the whole area moist. Hence the grass is permanently green and the leaves of trees grow firmly attached to supple branches… This is a work of art of royal luxury and its most striking feature is that the labor of cultivation is suspended above the heads of the spectators.”

However, no cuneiform texts describing the Hanging Gardens have ever been found. 

Ancient writers describe the possible use of something similar to an Archimedes screw as a process of irrigating the terraced gardens. Estimates based on descriptions of the gardens in ancient sources say the Hanging Gardens would have required a minimum amount of 8,200 gallons (37,000 liters) of water per day. Nebuchadnezzar II is also reported to have used massive slabs of stone, a technique not otherwise attested in Babylon, to prevent the water from eroding the ground.

There is some controversy as to whether the Hanging Gardens were an actual construction or a poetic creation, owing to the lack of documentation in contemporaneous Babylonian sources. There is also no mention of Nebuchadnezzar’s wife Amyitis (or any other wives), although a political marriage to a Median or Persian would not have been unusual. Herodotus, writing about Babylon closest in time to Nebuchadnezzar II, does not mention the Hanging Gardens in his Histories. However, it is possible that cuneiform texts on the Hanging Gardens may yet be found.

This is relevant to my interests

ticklethebears:

Portland Oregon, Then and now by Tinflower on Flickr.
via turnitalltoashes: archdaily.com
crookedindifference:

RMS Lusitania (1910)
bigmapblog:

Map of Oregon showing trading depots (1838)

Wow… it says the “Walla Matte” river instead of “Willamette”…

bigmapblog:

Map of Oregon showing trading depots (1838)

Wow… it says the “Walla Matte” river instead of “Willamette”…